New telescope, observatory upgrades take aim at 'dark energy'

The University of Texas McDonald Observatory, which recently received a $40 million facelift to its telescope, will now aim to study dark energy according to  The Daily Texan.

 The telescope is the world's third largest of its kind. (Photo courtesy of University of Texas)

The telescope is the world's third largest of its kind. (Photo courtesy of University of Texas)

 

Dark energy ,which is  the enigma that is defined as an unknown form of energy that can supposedly permeate through all of space, and in turn, help expand the already expansive universe. Dark energy also assists in repelling gravity, which is said to take up 70 percent of the universe.

The telescope at the McDonald Observatory will have the ability to create a 3-D map of the universe, view lights as old as 12 billion years old, see red-shift galaxies that can be up to 10 to 12 billion light years away, and have a range of field that can observe 120 times more of the sky at night. 

So what does this mean for science and cryptozoology? Well, having the capabilities to further explore dark energy, matter and and view galaxies that are far, far away, could lead to discoveries of more inhabitable, life as we know it -type of planets. Also, any chance to dive deeper into the universe and better understand its workings can only mean a better understanding of existence, place in universe and expand possibilities of tracking down just exactly where the visitors are coming from.

-MIKE DAMANTE